Question: Can A Neurologist Help With Balance Problems?

What kind of doctor should I see for balance problems?

To find out if you have a balance problem, your primary doctor may suggest that you see an otolaryngologist and an audiologist.

An otolaryngologist is a physician and surgeon who specializes in diseases and disorders of the ear, nose, neck, and throat..

What vitamin is good for balance?

Vitamin D may improve muscle strength and function, as well as balance due to the improved strength.

What is the best exercise for balance?

Or, stand up from a seated position without using your hands. Or try walking in a line, heel to toe, for a short distance. You can also try tai chi — a form of movement training that may improve balance and stability and reduce the incidence of falls.

Does Vision affect balance?

While vision may not appear to be the most important factor in keeping balance, the body needs them to maintain it normally. It takes the vestibular, vision, and proprioceptive systems working together to keep things level; but it is the vision which provides most of the necessary information.

What part of the body controls balance?

cerebellumThe cerebellum, in the back of the brain, controls balance, coordination and fine muscle control (e.g., walking). It also functions to maintain posture and equilibrium.

What happens when Vertigo doesn’t go away?

If the symptoms are very severe and don’t go away, surgery on the vestibular system (the organ of balance) may be considered. This involves destroying either the nerve fibers in the affected semicircular canal, or the semicircular canal itself. The sensory hair cells can then no longer pass information on to the brain.

How do I get my balance back?

Always have a sturdy object such as a chair within reach just in case you feel wobbly.One-leg stands. Stand straight. … Heel-to-toe walking. … Side-stepping. … Unassisted standing from a chair. … Tai chi. … Ankle pumping when you get out of bed.

Is Vertigo a neurological condition?

Vertigo can be caused by serious conditions, such as tumors, or conditions that are fairly benign, such the inner ear disorder Meniere’s disease. But for some people, no cause can be found. In this new study, neurologists have identified a new type of vertigo where treatment may be effective.

What neurological disorders cause balance problems?

Vertigo can be associated with many conditions, including:Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). … Vestibular neuritis. … Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness. … Meniere’s disease. … Migraine. … Acoustic neuroma. … Ramsay Hunt syndrome. … Head injury.More items…•

Can balance problems be cured?

Balance problems are sometimes corrected by addressing the underlying health condition. They may be treated with: medication. surgery.

Can a neurologist help with vertigo?

If you have been experiencing vertigo for more than a day or two, it’s so severe that you can’t stand or walk, or you are vomiting frequently and can’t keep food down, you should make an appointment with a neurologist.

How does your inner ear affect your balance?

Loop-shaped canals in your inner ear contain fluid and fine, hairlike sensors that help you keep your balance. At the base of the canals are the utricle and saccule, each containing a patch of sensory hair cells.

Can vertigo be seen on an MRI?

A team of researchers says it has discovered why so many people undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in newer high-strength machines, get vertigo, or the dizzy sensation of free-falling, while inside or when coming out of the tunnel-like machine.

Does walking improve balance?

Walking helps build lower-body strength, an important element of good balance. Walking is safe exercise for most people and, in addition to improving balance, counts toward your aerobic activity goals.

What is needed for balance?

Maintaining balance requires coordination of input from multiple sensory systems including the vestibular, somatosensory, and visual systems. The senses must detect changes of spatial orientation with respect to the base of support, regardless of whether the body moves or the base is altered.