Quick Answer: What Is The Current Immunization Schedule In Nigeria?

What is the immunization schedule for adults?

LegendVaccine19-26 years27-49 yearsInfluenza live attenuated (LAIV)1 dose annuallyTetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (Tdap or Td)1 dose Tdap, then Td or Tdap booster every 10 yrsMeasles, mumps, rubella (MMR)1 or 2 doses depending on indication (if born in 1957 or later)Varicella (VAR)2 doses (if born in 1980 or later)13 more rows•Feb 3, 2020.

Can I delay 6 month vaccinations?

The definition most commonly used is a delay of 30 days or more after the recommended age for each dose [3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]. A vaccine delay for a dose may impact on-time administration of subsequent doses and increase the child’s risk of disease targeted by the vaccine [11, 12].

What is the purpose of immunization?

Immunizations, also known as vaccinations, help protect you from getting an infectious disease. When you get vaccinated, you help protect others as well. Vaccines are very safe. It is much safer to get the vaccine than an infectious disease.

Is Nigeria a safe country?

There is a high level of crime throughout Nigeria, including armed robbery, kidnapping for ransom, home invasions, carjacking and violent assault. Criminal activity is high in urban areas, including the city of Lagos, as well as on the northern border with Niger and Chad.

What are 6 month vaccinations?

At 6 months of age, your baby should receive vaccines to protect them from the following diseases:Diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (pertussis) (DTaP) (3rd dose)Haemophilus influenzae type b disease (Hib) (3rd dose)Polio (IPV) (3rd dose)Pneumococcal disease (PCV13) (3rd dose)Rotavirus (RV) (3rd dose)More items…•

How many vaccines does a child get in Australia?

National Immunisation Program (NIP) The Australian National Immunisation Program (NIP) recommends and funds immunisation against 13 diseases for Australian children aged 0-4 years. To be fully protected against some diseases, your child might need to be immunised 2-4 times at different ages.

What are the challenges facing immunization in Nigeria?

Additional challenges for improving immunisation coverage in Nigeria have included lack of political will and commitment, paucity of funds, poor community participation and limited scaling-up of cost effective interventions. Outside a health centre after the introduction of pentavalent vaccine in 2013.

How many vaccines are there in 2020?

Currently, 16 vaccines – some requiring multiple doses at specific ages and times – are recommended from birth to 18 years old. Recommended vaccines include: Influenza (annual flu shot) Diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (DTaP)

Which two vaccines need to be separated by at least 28 days if not given simultaneously?

For persons with anatomic or functional asplenia and/or HIV, PCV13 should be administered first and MenACWY-D 4 weeks later. In patients recommended to receive both PCV13 and PPSV23, the 2 vaccines should not be administered simultaneously (28).

At what age is DPT vaccine given?

Children younger than 7 years of age receive DTaP or DT, while older children and adults receive Tdap and Td. Give infants and children 5 doses of DTaP. Give one dose at each of these ages: 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 15 through 18 months, and 4 through 6 years.

What are the six killer diseases?

These six are the target diseases of WHO’s Expanded Programme on Immuni- zation (EPI), and of UNICEF’s Univer- sal Childhood Immunization (UCI); measles, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), tetanus and tuberculosis.

What is the first vaccine given to a baby?

Shortly after birth, your baby should receive the first dose of the vaccine to help protect against the following disease: Hepatitis B (HepB) (1st dose)

What is an immunization schedule Why are they important?

The purpose of the recommended immunization schedule is to protect infants and children by providing immunity early in life, before they are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases.

Who schedule for immunization?

Vaccination as per the National Immunization schedule by Government of IndiaAgeNational Rural Heath Mission14 WeeksOPV3, Penta3(DPT+HepB+HiB), IPV9 MonthsMMR-1, /MR/Measels, JE Vaccine-116-24 MonthsMMR-1, OPV Booster, DPT 1st Booster, JE Vaccine-25-6 YearsDPT 2nd Booster5 more rows

What are the six killer diseases in Nigeria?

The vision of EPI in Nigeria is to improve the health of Nigerian children by eradicating all the six killer diseases, which are polio, measles, diphtheria, whooping cough, tuberculosis, and yellow fever.

Which type of vaccine is most effective?

Live attenuated vaccines contain whole bacteria or viruses which have been “weakened” so that they create a protective immune response but do not cause disease in healthy people. Live vaccines tend to create a strong and lasting immune response and are some of our best vaccines.

Which vaccines can you not give together?

of Different Vaccines If live parenteral (injected) vaccines (MMR, MMRV, varicella, zoster, and yellow fever) and live intranasal influenza vaccine (LAIV) are not administered at the same visit, they should be separated by at least 4 weeks.

What booster vaccines do adults need?

All adults need a seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine every year. … Every adult should get the Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years.

What is full immunization?

According to the WHO guideline [1], “complete or full immunization” coverage is defined as a child that has received one dose of BCG, three doses of pentavalent, pneumococcal conjugate (PCV), oral polio vaccines (OPV); two doses of Rota virus and one dose of measles vaccine.

Why is BCG given in left arm?

The vaccine is given just under the skin (intradermally), usually in the left upper arm. This is the recommended site, so that small scar left after vaccination can be easily found in the future as evidence of previous vaccination.

What is the most common disease in Nigeria?

major health problem in Nigeria. The top causes of death in Nigeria are; malaria, lower respiratory infections, HIV/AIDS, diarrheal diseases, road injuries, protein-energy malnutrition, cancer, meningitis, stroke and tuberculosis.