Quick Answer: What Kind Of Doctor Should I See For Primary Care?

What are primary care doctors called?

A primary care physician (PCP), or primary care provider, is a health care professional who practices general medicine.

PCPs are our first stop for medical care.

Most PCPs are doctors, but nurse practitioners and even physician assistants can sometimes also be PCPs..

What specialties fall under primary care?

Primary care specialties include family medicine, general internal medicine, general pediatrics, combined internal medicine/pediatrics (med/peds) and general obstetrics and gynecology (ob/gyn), fulfilling the general medical needs of specific patient populations.

Can a gynecologist be a primary care doctor?

Women often ask whether their OB-GYN can double as their primary care physician to take care of things like annual checkups and illnesses. The answer? Not exactly.

Do primary doctors do Pap smears?

Many primary care physicians also include gynecologic care such as pelvic exams, pap smears and breast exams as part of their annual wellness exam. Some primary care physicians, such as those focusing more on the care of the elderly, do not provide gynecologic exams and may refer to you to an OB/GYN.

Can you have more than one primary care doctor?

Many people see more than one doctor or health professional. Your primary care doctor, such as your family doctor or general practitioner, may refer you to another doctor for a problem. … Having many doctors can help you get the best care, but it also can cause problems.

Which is a focus of primary care?

Definitions of primary care often focus on the type or level of services, such as prevention, diagnostic and therapeutic services, health education and counseling, and minor surgery. Although primary care specifically emphasizes these services, many specialists also provide the same spectrum of services.

Can a gynecologist tell if you have been sexually active?

Even though your gynecologist won’t be able to tell whether you’ve had sex, it’s still important to talk openly and honestly about sex with them. This is so that they know whether to recommend STI testing, talk about birth control, and bring up other sexual health issues.

How often should you see a primary care doctor?

While opinions vary, routine physical exams are generally recommended once a year if you’re over the age of 50, and once every 3 years if you’re younger than 50 and in good health. If you have a chronic disease or other ongoing health issues, you should see your doctor more often, no matter how old you are.

Is Pediatric a primary care or specialist?

Pediatricians are primary care doctors who specialize in children’s health, including physical, mental, and social health. To be a pediatrician, doctors attend 4 years of medical school and spend 3 years as medical residents in pediatrics.

Can a primary care physician do a pelvic exam?

Some primary care doctors provide routine gynecological care like breast and pelvic exams, but others don’t. It all depends on the doctor. Primary care doctors who do provide gynecological care may still refer patients to gynecologists for more specific care if they think it’s needed.

Is geriatrics considered primary care?

Geriatrics is another area of medicine that is not always considered to be primary care, even though it is increasingly needed as the baby boomer population ages. Geriatricians are specially trained to care for adults over the age of 60.

Is it necessary to have a primary care doctor?

No matter how healthy you are, it’s a good idea to have a primary care doctor. Like the comfort of going back to your childhood home, there’s a sense of reliability in having a primary care doctor as your health “home.”

Can I use urgent care as primary care?

While urgent care services are beneficial for temporary care, for those with health insurance, it should never be used as a total replacement for your primary care doctor.

What is an example of primary care service?

Primary care includes health promotion, disease prevention, health maintenance, counseling, patient education, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses in a variety of health care settings (e.g., office, inpatient, critical care, long-term care, home care, day care, etc.).