What Does A Maxillofacial Dentist Do?

Is being an oral surgeon worth it?

The average oral surgeon — also referred to as an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, OMFS or OMS — can make a great six-figure salary, well in excess of what a general dentist earns, but the many years of education after dental school to specialize in oral surgery can mean getting a late start on earning any salary and ….

When should you see a maxillofacial surgeon?

There are many situations where a patient may be referred to a maxillofacial surgeon by their orthodontist or primary dentist. Underlying pathologies, complicated malocclusions, TMJ disorder or jaw deformities may be significantly improved through maxillofacial surgery.

Is maxillofacial surgeon a dentist?

Maxillofacial surgeons are specialist dentists who are certified to perform surgery on teeth, jaw bones and the face. They are trained to treat disorders, diseases, injuries and abnormalities in these parts of the body.

Why would a dentist refer you to an oral surgeon?

A dentist will normally refer patients to an oral surgeon for issues such as treatment of wisdom teeth, complex extractions, correction of congenital growth defects or if you have a complicated medical history. An oral surgeon is trained and skilled in the following procedures and many others.

Can I go straight to an oral surgeon?

While we accept referrals from your family dentist, you can come straight to us for your oral surgery needs. If you’ve been referred to our office by your dentist, want to make a direct appointment, or you have questions about any oral surgery needs, please feel free to call us at 717.551.

What does Maxillofacial Surgery cover?

Procedures undertaken by oral and maxillofacial surgeons include: surgical treatment of facial injuries – complex craniofacial fractures, fractures of the lower jaw, upper jaw, cheekbone, nose, and orbit (sometimes all of these together) and soft tissue injuries of the mouth, face and neck.

What does maxillofacial mean?

Maxillofacial” refers to the face and jaws, while “Oral” refers to the mouth.

What procedures do maxillofacial surgeons do?

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons perform surgeries of the mouth, jaws, and face, including dental implant surgery, bone grafting, wisdom tooth removal, corrective jaw surgery (orthognathic surgery), maxillofacial trauma, TMJ surgery, pathology & reconstruction, and facial cosmetic surgery.

What is the difference between an oral surgeon and a maxillofacial surgeon?

An oral and maxillofacial surgeon holds a medical degree and has extensive training in dental medicine. While an oral surgeon is unable to perform the most advanced oral surgical procedures, there are no limitations on the types of dental surgery that a maxillofacial surgeon can perform.

Do they put you to sleep for oral surgery?

General anesthesia is the only true sleep dentistry option. Under general anesthesia, patients remain completely unconscious throughout the treatment process. This ensures total comfort and relaxation, during even the most advanced oral surgery.

Should I go to a dentist or oral surgeon?

An oral surgeon is needed when your dental emergency requires the tooth to be extracted, or a restructuring of your bone and gum tissue. Oral surgeons have an extensive training in a particular field, and as a patient, you are typically referred to an oral surgeon by your dentist.

Do oral maxillofacial surgeons do root canals?

Oral Surgeons They also work with patients who need options for saving or replacing teeth, such as root canals and dental crowns. Furthermore, they help fix fitting issues for a patient’s denture, or correct temporomandibular joint problems.